The Ozone Hole

Common Sense Media says

Mediocre design buries useful ozone layer facts.

Age(i)

2
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17

Quality(i)

 

Learning(i)

What parents need to know

Positive messages

The site highlights the role of science, history, cooperation, and responsibility in protecting the planet.

Violence
Not applicable
Sex
Not applicable
Language
Not applicable
Consumerism
Not applicable
Drinking, drugs, & smoking
Not applicable
Privacy & safety
Not applicable

Parents Need to Know

Parents need to know that The Ozone Hole uses images, data, and videos from reliable sources like NASA, NOAA, and the Royal British Astronomical Society to educate the public about the ozone layer, climate, and the environment. The Ozone Hole is produced by The Ozone Hole, Inc. -- a nonprofit organization. Descriptions can be technical, but videos and images are appropriate for middle school kids and up. There is a staggering amount of information; approach the site with specific questions like "What is the ozone layer?" or "Why was the ozone hole so big in 2006?" or "What gases harm the ozone layer?" and use the site map to explore one concept at a time.

What kids can learn

Subjects

Science

  • chemistry
  • ecosystems
  • astronomy

Social Studies

  • government
  • history

Skills

Thinking & Reasoning

  • defining problems
  • making conclusions
  • analyzing evidence

Engagement, Approach, Support

Engagement

The Ozone Hole's staggering amount of content combined with poor design makes navigation a challenge. It's tough for kids to find things that are age-appropriate or that interest them.

Learning Approach

Images, video, and text do create a thorough reference for kids to learn more about the environment and international cooperation. But it's hard to appreciate the depth here.

Support

There's very little support for kids. Links to reputable scientific organizations and groups provide some extensions.

What kids can learn

Subjects

Science

  • chemistry
  • ecosystems
  • astronomy

Social Studies

  • government
  • history

Skills

Thinking & Reasoning

  • defining problems
  • making conclusions
  • analyzing evidence

Kids can learn how human and natural factors affect the ozone layer's ability to protect life on Earth. Current and historical data show the progression of the ozone hole over Antarctica from the 1980s to today and its behavior month-to-month in any particular year. Kids can also learn about the Montreal Protocol, a landmark agreement among countries around the world to stop using gases that harm the ozone layer. There's no interactivity on the site, but the information can be a jumping-off point for creative activities offline.

This Learning Rating review was written by Michelle Kitt

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What's it about?

THE OZONE HOLE separates its content into sections: News, Links, Ozone Hole History, Ozone Hole 2006, Ozone Hole 2012, Montreal Protocol, and Arctic Ozone Hole. Kids can either click one of these sections at the top, or click Site Map where things are more organized. Kids will scroll through each section for stuff to read, images to look at, and often videos to watch. There’s a link to The Ozone Hole’s active Facebook page that has material not found on the website.

Is it any good?

QUALITY
 

The Ozone Hole approaches issues affecting earth’s ozone layer in a balanced way, rooted in science and covering human-made and natural phenomena. It’s a reference site so don’t expect games or activities, and it suffers from unfortunate long-scrolling and inconsistent design. Still, there are a few good nuggets worth the trip way, way down the page. Plenty of colorful, straightforward images and a video on the main page tell the story for young kids who don’t understand the technical stuff. There’s also special emphasis on the Montreal Protocol, described by Kofi Annan, Former Secretary General of the United Nations as "the single most successful international agreement to date."

Families can talk about...

  • The Montreal Protocol is one example of dozens of international agreements to protect the environment. Find out about other agreements that protect animals, fisheries, oceans, water, forests, land, mining, and more.

Website details

Genre:Educational
Topics:Science and nature
Price:Free
Pricing structure:Free

This review of The Ozone Hole was written by

About our rating system

  • ON: Content is age-appropriate for kids this age.
  • PAUSE: Know your child; some content may not be right for some kids.
  • OFF: Not age-appropriate for kids this age.
  • NOT FOR KIDS: Not appropriate for kids of any age.

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Quality

Our star rating assesses the media's overall quality.

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Learning ratings

  • Best: Really engaging; great learning approach.
  • Very Good: Engaging; good learning approach.
  • Good: Pretty engaging; good learning approach.
  • Fair: Somewhat engaging; OK learning approach.
  • Not for Learning: Not recommended for learning.
  • Not for Kids: Not age-appropriate for kids; not recommended for learning.

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