Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics Official Site

Website review by
Jacqueline Rupp, Common Sense Media
Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics Official Site Website Poster Image
Official Olympics site could do without the alcohol ads.

Parents say

age 11+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

age 11+
Based on 3 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this website.

Positive Messages

The reporting on the site generally stays objective. Kids will get a balanced dose of information that isn't only about the American athletes. Some stories focus on the dedication and sacrifices some of the competitors have made to get to the games.

Violence & Scariness
Sexy Stuff
Language
Consumerism

There is a section of the website dedicated to shopping for Olympic souveniers, but this page doesn't stand out from the other information-related pages. There are also random ads that appear on pages, including beer ads on the Snowboarding page. Most of the ads however focus on promoting Canada as a tourist destination.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

On the Snowboarding page there's an ad for Coors Light that urges visitors to "Bring Home the Koozie," which are beer cozies made from the body suits of the women's Swedish kuge team. Clicking on the link brings up an age verification page.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that some of the ads on the official Olympics site are not appropriate for kids, such as beer ads that tie-in to the games. That said, the amount of advertising on the site shouldn't make your family have to miss out on the fun and up-to-the-minute information it supplies. The voluminous content of Olympic coverage has way more presence than the ads. Don't let kids overlook the cool Olympic mini-games hidden in the More 2010 Information drop-down box, along with the special site dedicated to the cute Winter Games mascots.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Parent of a 11 year old Written byfabiola 654 March 25, 2010
my kid thinks that she love it because is good for kids
Kid, 9 years old March 2, 2010
i love it
Teen, 17 years old Written byPalfrey W. March 27, 2010

Welcome to Inspiration City! =]

Based on the fact that all athletes in the Olympic Games strive to their goals, in order to even appear in the competitions, any child would feel quite honored... Continue reading

Is it any good?

If you want to keep complete track of the medal count, scope some cool pics of the games, or just dig a little deeper into the myriad athletes and sports of the 2010 VANCOUVER OLYMPICS this is the site to do it all. Like a digital Olympic encyclopedia, the site is an avalanche of information where you can uncover the stories behind the sports like India's determined luge competitor who almost missed the games after breaking his sled. You can even learn why skeleton isn't just a part of the body (it's an actual Olympic sport!). Great organization and cute touches will engage both kids and adults.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about ads for alcohol. How do these advertisements make you feel about the lessons you've been taught about alcohol? Do the ads make it seem appeal to drink? How does seeing an ad for alcohol on an Olympic web site make you feel? Do you think alcohol should be promoted on a site that for all ages and seeks to celebrate the best of sports?

  • Families can talk about the Winter Olympics and the role models that will emerge from the games. Have you admired any atheletes? Do you admire them for their performance capabilities or for the challenges they've overcome.

  • Families can talk about what it takes to be an Olympic athelete. These competitiors may make what they do seem easy, but how much training do you think it takes to get to this level of skill and athleticism? What lessons can you take from their stories to inspire you to stay motivated toward reaching your goals?

Website details

For kids who love the thrill and diversity of the Olympic games

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