Want personalized picks that fit your family?

Set preferences to see our top age-appropriate picks for your kids.

Get age-based picks

Vine Camera

App review by
Chris Morris, Common Sense Media
Vine Camera App Poster Image
Clever video app now connected to Twitter.
Popular with kids

Parents say

age 16+
Based on 5 reviews

Kids say

age 13+
Based on 23 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this app.

Educational Value

While teens could use Vine as a creative tool, we don't recommend it for learning because of the mature content that's easy to encounter.

Ease of Play

The app is incredibly easy to use: it's super simple to post videos to social media or just save them to your device.

Violence

Can contain violent or simulated violent behavior. It was easy to find posts promoting guns, knives, and other weapons -- sometimes accompanied by children's music. There were also videos of fist fighting, both real and simulated.

Sex

Some explicit sexual content, but it's much less likely to show up during casual use. While some hashtags have been disabled, making it more challenging to find hardcore sexual content if you're looking for it, many posters work hard to get around the filters. Some posts appear with a warning ("This post may contain sensitive content. Tap to view."). Others contain no warning and will just start playing.

Language

Website is populated by user-generated content, which can (and often does) contain any form of strong language, including the "N" word and motherf----r.

Consumerism

User-generated content often contains name brands, and some companies also promote their brands. 

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

The user-generated content on sometimes celebrates drug and alcohol use -- particularly marijuana.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Vine Camera is a camera app that lets users record six-second video clips and share them to Twitter or save them to their device. Previously, Vine was a social media app: You could post your own content, share videos via direct messages, and search for others' content. However, since the app was purchased by Twitter, users can access their archived content on the Vine.co website but they can't add new content. Many of the archived videos are harmless, but parents need to be aware that many videos are full of content that is inappropriate for children. Read the app's privacy policy to find out about the types of information collected and shared.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written byemmaceliaava June 13, 2013

Too much opportunity for abuse on Vine and no accountability for the company itself.

Vine in theory can be fun, but can be very easily abused. Anyone can follow your child, they don't need to get their request approved like on facebook or i... Continue reading
Adult Written byBlair111 July 9, 2015

The app "Vine"

There are some bad things in the app "Vine". I check my sons account daily and if I see anything that is not okay, I make him delete it! Vine is noth... Continue reading
Teen, 14 years old Written byCWG1 June 9, 2013

Bad, but can still have fun!!

This app is fun, but it is pretty bad.. If you look for humor you find it, but if you look for stuff like porn you will find it. It also has strong language. It... Continue reading
Teen, 16 years old Written byalynichelle May 4, 2013

Vine Vine Vine

Depends, if you're looking for something bad you will find it. If you're not, then nothing bad should ever show up.

What's it about?

To record a video using VINE CAMERA, simply hold your finger on the screen. Lift to stop the recording. After you've recorded your six seconds of video, it just takes a few taps to post it to Twitter or save it to your device's camera roll. Tap the icon at the bottom to reveal other photo tools that help you keep your camera level or turn on its flash. Users can share directly to Twitter.

Is it any good?

Though this beloved tool doesn't stand alone anymore, teens can still use it to make unique creations or iffy content and visit the website to see old Vines. Before its social media features were discontinued, Vine developed a unique community of people posting videos that are often creative, funny, and sometimes thought-provoking. Although you can no longer upload new videos using Vine Camera, old posts are still available at Vine.co. People can browse and search videos on that site through a web browser. If teens do browse the archived videos online, they'll find that Vine videos run the gamut, from stop-motion videos of puzzles doing and undoing themselves, to six-second skits showing how a teen wakes up on a school day vs. waking up during the summer, to commentaries on a Miley Cyrus video delivered mainly through facial expressions. There are also a lot of danger zones for kids; it's much too easy to find offensive content. Though there's a lot of humorous, clever expression, much of it isn't appropriate for kids.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about why Vine Camera is fun for teens and how they want to use it. Be honest about your concerns and talk about your rules. What is okay to post? What could be hurtful or embarrassing?

  • Talk about ways you can use this video app creatively. What can you film in six seconds? What kind of story can you tell?

  • If you do visit Vine.co with your teens, watch some random videos with your kid to see what comes up. Discuss the content you see. 

App details

For kids who love creativity and being social

Our editors recommend

Common Sense Media's unbiased ratings are created by expert reviewers and aren't influenced by the product's creators or by any of our funders, affiliates, or partners.

See how we rate

About these links

Common Sense Media, a nonprofit organization, earns a small affiliate fee from Amazon or iTunes when you use our links to make a purchase. Thank you for your support.

Read more

Our ratings are based on child development best practices. We display the minimum age for which content is developmentally appropriate. The star rating reflects overall quality and learning potential.

Learn how we rate