Assassin's Creed: The Ezio Collection

Game review by
Paul Semel, Common Sense Media
Assassin's Creed: The Ezio Collection Game Poster Image
Three deep, mature stealth-action games get mild upgrade.

Parents say

age 11+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

age 14+
Based on 5 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this game.

Positive Messages

Player uses violence to achieve his goals, even if those goals are sometimes noble.

Positive Role Models & Representations

While players do help people, they also kill, steal from people, including some who are innocent.

Ease of Play

Newcomers will face steep learning curve; otherwise, easy to learn.

Violence

Players use knives, swords, explosives to kill people; it's often bloody, shown in slow motion.

Sex

Though no nudity, lots of suggestive behavior. There are prostitutes, ribald conversations about sexual prowess; women display ample cleavage. A clothed love scene in one game; in another you have to undress a woman.

Language

Frequent use of "f--k," "s--t," "hell," "damn," "ass."

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

People shown drinking wine.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Assassin's Creed: The Ezio Collection is a collection of three previously released action games: Assassin's Creed II, Assassin's Creed Brotherhood, and Assassin's Creed Revelations. Players will frequently use knives, swords, and other weapons to kill people, often in slow motion. While there's no nudity, there's a lot of suggestive behavior, including a love scene, a min- game where you have to undress a woman, lots of ribald conversations, interactions with prostitutes, and copious amounts of cleavage. Dialogue is also peppered with lots of profanity, such as "f--k," "s--t," and more. Characters are also shown drinking wine in scenes.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Parent of a 11 and 12 year old Written byDavid C. November 20, 2017

No sexually explicit content

In the collection, there are 3 hit games in the 'Assasan's Creed' franchise. You play an assasan, 'Ezio', and assassinate varuous targe... Continue reading
Teen, 16 years old Written byCrispandCrunch December 8, 2016

Violent but OK for teens

Depends how mature your teen is. people always use violence to achieve their goals even if the goals are dumb. It's okay to let your 17 year old kids play... Continue reading
Teen, 16 years old Written byNewAgePerspective December 25, 2016

"mild upgrade" is a complete understatement

the ezio trilogy is the best way to immerse yourself in the history behind one of the greatest assassin's. if you want a story you read cat in the hat, you... Continue reading

What's it about?

ASSASSIN'S CREED: THE EZIO COLLECTION presents three visually upgraded games from this long-running series: 2009's Assassin's Creed II, 2010's Assassin's Creed Brotherhood, and 2011's Assassin's Creed Revelations. In all of them, you play a modern-day man who uses a device to enter the mind of Ezio Auditore da Firenze, a member of a secret society of assassins back in the 15th and 16th centuries. As Ezio, you have to kill important people while exploring the local area, which, in turn, shows your modern self and your friends what happened back then.

Is it any good?

Though this compilation doesn't offer anything radically new if you've beaten the included games, this collection presents three solid stealth-action games for newcomers. Assassin's Creed: The Ezio Collection brings the Xbox 360 and PlayStation 4 games Assassin's Creed II, Assassin's Creed Brotherhood, and Assassin's Creed Revelations to the Xbox One and PlayStation 4, along with the relevant short films Assassin's Creed Lineage and Assassin's Creed Embers. But since all this adds is some slight graphical enhancements and some movies you may not have seen, this isn't worth getting if you've already played these games. If you haven't, though, this compilation presents what's arguably the strongest three games in this series. Cast as the titular Ezio Auditore da Firenze, you get to see what it was like to be a member of a secret society of assassins back in the 15th and 16th centuries -- which is why you do a lot of running, jumping, and climbing as you track and ultimately kill your target, all of which actions are driven by an intriguing sci-fi story that connects to modern times in a curious way.

Players have to use a variety of sneaky skills to locate and then get close to their targets, skills that come in handy as you try to then get away before anyone can get revenge on you. It's also just fun to sneakily pick people's pockets or climb to the top of the tallest structure in town so you can enjoy the view. That said, these games can get redundant, especially if you play them back to back, and there are times when your enemies act like idiots. Still, if you enjoy being sneaky and would like to do it back before indoor plumbing, the three games in the Assassin's Creed: The Ezio Collection form an intriguing trilogy that melds history and sci-fi with some challenging action.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about violence in video games. Does it make a difference to you that the characters you kill are all human? What about the fact that they're actually already dead, and you're only seeing how it happened?

  • Families can talk about history. What does this game teach us about what the world was like in the 15th and 16th centuries? Would you like to read a book about it?

Game details

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