SpongeBob SquarePants: The Battle for Bikini Bottom

Game review by
Kate Pavao, Common Sense Media
SpongeBob SquarePants: The Battle for Bikini Bottom Game Poster Image
Benign game misses target audience.
Popular with kidsParents recommend

Parents say

age 6+
Based on 6 reviews

Kids say

age 6+
Based on 28 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this game.

Positive Messages

Spongebob gets along with all kinds of creatures, though Squidward looks a bit like a Jewish stereotype. SpongeBob lives in Bikini Bottom, players must collect his underwear, and there are random trees strewn with toilet paper, but that's as racy as it g

Violence & Scariness
Language
Consumerism

No product placement (except for stuff like fictional Clamsicles), but the game provides a promotion for the television show.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this game is cute and benign, as the show's fans would expect. But it has too much going on to keep younger players focused, and is too tedious for older ones.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Parent of a 17 year old Written bybobbyman July 19, 2010
Written byAnonymous May 30, 2010

Perfect for kids NOT scared of robots

It's awsome. Some hard parts like beating times on the slides and probley not for younger kids. Some of the robots scare my 7 year old who acts like she... Continue reading
Kid, 12 years old January 9, 2010

Wait.. Currency is a problem?

I honestly played for a lot of times , there is a bit of violence when fighting and stuff , but it isnt so bad , i mean , the Sims 2 , heck , that stuff is just... Continue reading
Teen, 15 years old Written byMarioSonicStarFox August 1, 2011

Very enjoyable Spongebob videogame

Spongebob: Battle For Bikini Bottom is a fun, easy game that you can just pick up and play when you're in the mood for some silliness. Spongebob and his pa... Continue reading

What's it about?

Evil Plankton has unleashed a mass of malicious robots on Bikini Bottom (though SpongeBob thinks he inadvertently invited this disaster) in SPONGEBOB SQUAREPANTS: THE BATTLE FOR BIKINI BOTTOM. Now they're wreaking havoc from Goo Lagoon to Jellyfish Fields, and SpongeBob and friends are on a quest to stop them and save the denizens of their underwater home.

Along the way, players collect precious golden spatulas and Patrick's dirty socks, and complete other side missions. Changing among the popular show's three main characters, players swing above the city on Sandy's lasso, use Patrick to toss around a variety of \"throw fruit,\" or turn into SpongeBall to bowl over enemies.

Is it any good?

Creative stuff, but the anticipated audience here is unclear. The missions are difficult to complete and simultaneous, and younger players may lose track of what they're trying to accomplish, never mind actually finishing a level. Conversely, more experienced players may tire of the repetitive moves required to complete the almost 100 tasks.

If you just want to see SpongeBob and his friends frolic around Bikini Bottom, there's plenty to soak up. But accomplishing missions requires a level of expertise that may outpace the skills of the show's young fans.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about marketing tie-ins and how this game promotes the SpongeBob SquarePants empire.

Game details

  • Platforms: PlayStation 2
  • Price: $39.99
  • Available online? Not available online
  • Developer: THQ
  • Release date: November 25, 2003
  • Genre: Action/Adventure
  • ESRB rating: E

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