Addams Family Values

Movie review by
Polly M. Robertus, Common Sense Media
Addams Family Values Movie Poster Image
Popular with kids
Witty '90s sequel has lots of innuendo, violent scenes.
  • PG-13
  • 1993
  • 94 minutes

Parents say

age 11+
Based on 5 reviews

Kids say

age 10+
Based on 15 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Positive Messages

Despite their quirky behavior, this family loves each other fiercely and unconditionally. The movie also promotes the importance of being true to yourself and not conforming to fit in with others.

Positive Role Models & Representations

The movie's humor relies on the family's atypical values. But there's no doubt who the real villain is, and the family is loving and accepting -- especially when compared to mean-spirited outsiders. 

Violence

All of the movie's violence is played for macabre humor. Many attempted killings, several involving an infant. Electrocution, explosion, fire set during a play at camp. Gunshots, knife throwing, attempted beheading. Serial killer trading cards.

Sex

A voluptuous villain has explicit sexual designs on Uncle Fester; seduction and discussions of virginity. Morticia and Gomez are passionately in love. Foster keeps a magazine with pictures of scantily-clad women under his bed. Talk of sex between Fester and Debbie. When a child claims that a stork visiting parents is the reason babies are made, Wednesday counters with, "They had sex." 

Language

Language includes "damn," "God" (as an exclamation), and rude phrases like "eat me." 

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Cigarette smoking. Vodka drinking. Champagne drinking. Cocktail mixed for a baby. 

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Addams Family Values is the 1993 sequel to the 1991 movie and 1960s television show in which Uncle Fester unwittingly marries a serial killer. Like its predecessors, there's plenty of macabre humor and comedic violence, including scenes featuring bathtub electrocution, Wednesday attempting to throw her infant baby brother off a roof, attempts at beheading, and serial killer trading cards. A voluptuous villain has explicit sexual designs on Uncle Fester; seduction and discussions of virginity. Foster keeps a magazine with pictures of scantily-clad women under his bed. Talk of sex between Fester and Debbie. When a child claims that a stork visiting parents is the reason babies are made, Wednesday counters with, "They had sex." Cigar and cigarette smoking. Infrequent mild profanity, including rude phrases like "eat me."  Some drinking, including a cocktail mixed for a baby. 

 

Wondering if Addams Family Values is OK for your kids?

Set preferences and get age-appropriate recommendations with Common Sense Media Plus. Join now

Continue reading Show less

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Parent of a 8 and 10-year-old Written byShelley A. October 22, 2017

Sex Scene

We really like the dark Addams family. But the sex scene between Debbie and Fester was really uncomfortable for my family to view- too much for kids!
Adult Written byAidan S. August 7, 2015
Some mild sexual references and violence
Kid, 12 years old September 3, 2014
Teen, 15 years old Written byccrowley24 April 28, 2020

What's the story?

The Addams Family is back in ADDAMS FAMILY VALUES, in which the children's jealousy of new baby brother Pubert leads to the hiring of an evil nanny named Debby (Joan Cusack), who has designs on Uncle Fester. When she sends Wednesday (Christina Ricci) and Pugsley (Jimmy Workman) to a snobbish summer camp and marries Fester, things look grim. Can the kids expose Debby in time to save their uncle -- and the rest of the family?

Is it any good?

More complex and just as witty as the first film, this one is also more disturbingly violent and sexually insinuating -- too much so for the youngest ones who might enjoy the first movie. Cusack is marvelous as the greedy black widow, and the addition of Pubert to the family offers lots of laughs, especially when we learn how much his parents are enjoying Morticia's painful labor. However, a lot of violent action (with too-near misses) involves him, and some parents might feel uncomfortable with it.

The scenes at camp are among Addams Family Values' cleverest. Kids who've felt isolated at camp will identify entirely as misfits Wednesday and Pugsley struggle in a world of conformist blond snobs. Although the action here occasionally drags, the other campers and the enthusiastic, uncomprehending counselors make great foils for the Addams children's macabre revenge. Again, some parents might find that the humor goes unnecessarily far. And it's a satisfying relief when the family members are reunited, and return to their bleakly cozy mansion.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about macabre humor. How does the movie use humor rooted in death and violence to get laughs? 

  • Talk about a time when each family member maintained his or her values in the face of peer pressure in Addams Family Values.

  • What would be the challenges in trying to adapt a television show from the past into something that would appeal to modern audiences? 

Movie details

Our editors recommend

For kids who love oddball characters

Common Sense Media's unbiased ratings are created by expert reviewers and aren't influenced by the product's creators or by any of our funders, affiliates, or partners.

See how we rate

Streaming options powered by JustWatch

About these links

Common Sense Media, a nonprofit organization, earns a small affiliate fee from Amazon or iTunes when you use our links to make a purchase. Thank you for your support.

Read more

Our ratings are based on child development best practices. We display the minimum age for which content is developmentally appropriate. The star rating reflects overall quality.

Learn how we rate