Evil Dead

Movie review by
Jeffrey M. Anderson, Common Sense Media
Evil Dead Movie Poster Image
Parents recommendPopular with kids
Gore-filled horror remake entertains but can't top original.
  • R
  • 2013
  • 91 minutes

Parents say

age 16+
Based on 17 reviews

Kids say

age 16+
Based on 52 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Positive Messages

An older brother learns how to be present to help out his family members, improving on an earlier failure to visit his mom in the hospital. His sister yearns to stop her drug addiction, enlisting the aid of her closest friends and family to help. Unfortunately, teamwork between the siblings and the other characters doesn't always go very smoothly.

Positive Role Models & Representations

A main character is a drug addict who tries to kick her habit. Her behavior varies from admirable to poor, and the events of the story tend to impede her progress, but she at least appears to be on the right track.

Violence

Extreme, over-the-top gore, including gallons of dripping, spraying, vomiting, and raining blood; fighting; bashing with hard objects; slicing and stabbing; shooting (with both nail guns and regular guns); burning alive; severed limbs; and being scalded with hot water. Dead cats and a dead dog are shown. The infamous "tree rape" scene from the original movie is repeated here (a tree's branches violate a female character), but it's slightly less graphic.

Sex

It appears as if some of the characters are in relationships, but very little is made of this, with little affection/kissing shown. One character uses the sexually suggestive phrase "bumping uglies" in passing.

Language

Much of the language is seen in print, in the "book of the dead." Words include "f--k," "motherf----r," and "bitch." But characters also say "f--k," as well as "s--t," "hell," "damn," "oh my God," and "a--holes." A demon uses "c--t" and "c--k" once each, but in a "demonic" voice that isn't always clear.

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

The movie's main character is a young adult drug addict who's trying to kick her habit. She dumps a packet of what appears to be heroin down a well as she vows to quit. She's never shown taking drugs, but she does suffer DTs during the course of the movie. She's also seen smoking a cigarette in one scene.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Evil Dead is a remake of Sam Raimi's classic early-'80s horror movie The Evil DeadLike the original, it's filled with over-the-top gore, including spraying, dripping, and raining blood; stabbing; slicing; bashing; shooting (with both nail guns and regular guns); burning; and scalding. Dead cats and a dead dog are shown, and the infamous "tree rape" scene from the original is repeated here, though it's slightly less graphic this time around. On the other hand, language is stronger here than in the original, with both spoken and printed uses of "f--k" and "s--t." And a main character is a drug addict who's attempting to kick her habit; she's shown dumping a packet of heroin and going through withdrawals, but she isn't shown taking drugs. Sexuality isn't much of an issue, though minor suggestion is seen/heard.

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User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written byYackattack November 23, 2018

Not as bad as you think

The evil dead says f—k about 30 times and c0ck once and c4nt 1 time. There is some extreme violence but if you’ve seen a slasher movie before u should be able t... Continue reading
Parent Written byAaron C. June 13, 2020

Gorefest. NOT for Kids or Sensitive people.

Evil Dead 2013 is a literal gorefest that lives up to it's predecessor. Extreme Brutal Gore & Gallons of Blood. NOT for Kids or Sensitive people. I... Continue reading
Teen, 17 years old Written byFrozenPyre November 24, 2015

Extremely violent remake, but is absolutely AMAZING

This movie is one of the most violent movies I've seen (and I saw The Serbian Film and Salo), and somehow it got an R rating.

Some of the scenes are plain... Continue reading
Teen, 16 years old Written byHxw.they.jxdge March 20, 2020

Very gory but not to scary

This movie was pretty intense but not as scary as I thought it would be. Hardly any jump scares but the violence and gore are over the top. Amazing graphics and... Continue reading

What's the story?

David (Shiloh Fernandez) and his girlfriend, Natalie (Elizabeth Blackmore), arrive at a remote cabin in the woods, where David's sister, Mia (Jane Levy), is going to attempt to kick her drug habit. Two other friends, Eric (Lou Taylor Pucci) and Olivia (Jessica Lucas), are also there to help. Tension arises around the fact that David hasn't been around lately, but things get much worse when the group finds dozens of dead cats hanging from the rafters in the basement. Then Eric finds and reads a strange-looking book, which unleashes all kinds of horrific demons into the cabin -- or is it just Mia hallucinating? It's eventually up to David to find a way to put a stop to all the craziness for good.

Is it any good?

This fresh take on Sam Raimi's The Evil Dead packs a punch. A newcomer from Uruguay, director Fede Alvarez was given the task of remaking one of the great classics of the horror genre, and though he can't top the original, he provides enough new ideas and enough energy to make the remake a decent movie in its own right. To start, he turns the cabin getaway into a trip with a serious point -- kicking a drug habit -- rather than just a weekend party. This gives a whole new slant to the story, and the character's potential withdrawal hallucinations can be blamed for the initial horrors.

Otherwise, Alvarez seems to know where to pay tribute to the original -- i.e. the use of a chainsaw, vomiting a river of blood, a light bulb filling with blood, and the appearance of a 1973 Oldsmobile Delta 88. Alvarez also tries to keep the kinetic, frenzied horror from the original, though he makes it a bit darker and less comical. But he also knows where to depart, with his new characters, their relationships, and their particular problems.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about Evil Dead's violence and gore. Why did the filmmakers go so over the top with it? What effect does it have? Why?

  • Is the movie scary? What would make it scarier, or less scary?

  • How does this movie compare to the original? Why do you think so many horror movies get remade? Is this one better or worse than others you've seen? Why?

  • How did you feel about the main character trying to quit her drug habit? Is she a sympathetic character, or does she seem like a bad person?

Movie details

Our editors recommend

For kids who love horror films

Themes & Topics

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