Galaxy Quest

Movie review by
Nell Minow, Common Sense Media
Galaxy Quest Movie Poster Image
Hilarious, fast, funny, fresh fun for the family.
  • PG
  • 1999
  • 102 minutes
Parents recommend

Parents say

age 10+
Based on 17 reviews

Kids say

age 9+
Based on 9 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Positive Messages
Violence & Scariness

Lots of comic sci-fi violence, one sad death

Sexy Stuff

Mild references, lots of clevage

Language

Mild

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Character drinks to feel better and passes out

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this fun, kid-friendly adventure includes some cartoonish sci-fi violence (some of it rather gross) and one sad death. Also, a character gets so drunk that he passes out and is then very hung over, and there are mild references to Allen's character sleeping "with every Terakian slave girl and moon princess" on the show.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written bylartisane May 1, 2009

Think twice before showing to a young child...

THE TORTURING OF THE ALIEN HAS BEEN DISTURBING FOR OUR CHILD AS WELL AS THE DEATH AND THE SMALL CHILD LIKE ALIENS WHO ATTACK IN NUMBERS TO EAT ONE OF THEIR OWN... Continue reading
Parent of a 11 year old Written bybobsax May 24, 2010

good for older kids over 10 or 11.

It's a funny movie but I agree that it has a fair amount of adult humor that wasn't mentioned . It seems that in the old days movies had to have profa... Continue reading
Teen, 15 years old Written byMitchell Charleston May 24, 2013

Love it!!!

I love the 1999 film Galaxy Quest. It is so awesome. I love the humor. When I saw it in theaters back in 1999, I was laughing NON-STOP. I'm not joking. I r... Continue reading
Teen, 17 years old Written bymoviewannabe April 22, 2013

I was six when I saw this for the first time

I must admit, any kids who love sci-fi movies that mix thrills with laughs should watch this.

What's the story?

In this sci-fi spoof, Tim Allen, Alan Rickman, and Sigourney Weaver play washed-up stars of a cheesy Star Trek-style show that ended nearly 20 years ago. Believing that the reruns they watched are real, a group of aliens head to Earth to ask for their help. The TV stars find themselves on a real-life replica of their television series spaceship, lovingly constructed by the aliens to replicate every detail from the show. Put in a real-life confrontation with a lizard-looking tyrant, the cast tries to remember lines and plots from old episodes to help them defeat him. The premise leads to hilarious lines and situations that play on both Star Trek and the actors' hang-ups. For example, Rickman's Spock/McCoy-hybrid character stares glumly at his alien gill make-up in the mirror and murmurs about the time he got five curtain calls as Richard III. Sigourney Weaver, the sexy Lt. Uhura equivalent, repeats everything the computer says. Tony Shaloub as the spaceship's Scottie-like mechanic and Sam Rockwell as the imperiled expendable officer also deliver hilarious lines.

Is it any good?

Sharply written and performed, this hilarious romp affectionately skewers television sci-fi, its stars, and its fans. Not since William Shatner told Trekkers Dana Carvey and Jon Lovitz to "get a life" back on Saturday Night Live has there been such a sublime look at this world, reminding us that intelligence and humor are not mutually exclusive.

The fast, funny, and fresh script takes a terrific premise and unreels it in a tightly constructed farce that is filled with surprises. Perhaps the biggest one is that we really come to care about the characters.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about what TV shows and movies this film is spoofing. Is it funny even if you haven't seen the original titles it's based on? Why or why not?

Movie details

Themes & Topics

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For kids who love sci-fi

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