Grease

Movie review by
Kate Pluta, Common Sense Media
Grease Movie Poster Image
Musical phenomenon is still great fun but quite racy.
  • PG
  • 1978
  • 110 minutes
Popular with kidsParents recommend

Parents say

age 11+
Based on 41 reviews

Kids say

age 11+
Based on 157 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Positive Messages

Male characters view females as sex objects. One T-Bird member claims that "chicks" are "only good for one thing." Unpopular students are the butts of several jokes. Sandy and Danny act against their respective natures to try to impress each other. 1950s gender role models are exemplified and upended.

Positive Role Models & Representations

The movie addresses the complex issue of 1950s gender roles, which still reverberate today. Danny recognizes the dishonesty of perpetuating the aloof image that certifies his standing among the cool guys when he falls in love and wants to show his true feelings to Sandy.

Violence

While playing sports, Danny hits two students and snaps an umpire's mask. A T-Bird draws a switchblade in preparation for a rumble.

Sex

A character is briefly shown in her bra. Characters make out. At the drive-in, Danny makes a pass at Sandy. Sexual activity is implied when two characters discuss a broken condom, resulting in Rizzo's fear she may be pregnant. Naked derrieres are seen when characters moon a passing car and, later, a television camera. The T-Birds discuss female anatomy, and one fellow peeks up the skirts of female students. The Pink Ladies dance around in their nighties mocking Sandy's virginity. The song "Greased Lightning" has strong sexual content, though the innuendo may go over the heads of younger viewers.

Language

Characters use an obscene finger gesture and say "ass," "crap," "weenie," "heinie," "flog your log," "friggin' A," "dingleberries," "jugs," and "dork," and one sings, "Look at me, I'm Sandra Dee, lousy with virginity." The song "Greased Lightning" has profanity including "t-t," "s--t," and "p---y wagon."

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Characters smoke, drink, and spike the punch at the school dance.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Grease is full of somewhat racy material, although most of it isn't any more shocking than the content of today's teen films and television shows. Still, you might want to give it a quick "refresher" watch before showing it to kids under 13 to make sure you remember exactly what they'll be seeing. Characters smoke, drink, and spike the punch at the school dance. Characters use an obscene finger gesture and say "ass," "crap," "weenie," "flog your log," and the like, and one sings, "Look at me, I'm Sandra Dee, lousy with virginity." The song "Greased Lightning" has profanity including "t-t," "s--t," and "p---y wagon."  Characters make out. At the drive-in, Danny makes a pass at Sandy. Sexual activity is implied when two characters discuss a broken condom, resulting in Rizzo's fear she may be pregnant. Naked derrieres are seen when characters moon a passing car and, later, a television camera. The T-Birds discuss female anatomy, and one fellow peeks up the skirts of female students. The Pink Ladies dance around in their nighties mocking Sandy's virginity. A T-Bird draws a switchblade in preparation for a rumble.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Parent of a 8 year old Written byMomMcA October 20, 2010

fine for older kids, but not for tweens

While I loved this movie as a teen (I was around 11 when it came out) my parents were SURE to have a talk with me about the choices Sandy was making, and why sh... Continue reading
Adult Written bymom 4 ever April 9, 2008
Teen, 14 years old Written bytheflickchick March 29, 2011

good

the bad stuff: a lot of kissing and making out, some language, the S word on a song, teens smoking and drinking. the good stuff: no positive role models or mes... Continue reading
Kid, 12 years old March 6, 2011

Grease: Cool Classic?

The T-Birds smoke and drink, but they also refer to girls as useful for only the purpose of having sex. This greatly bothers me. I am a girl, and girls are a lo... Continue reading

What's the story?

This movie covers quintessential high school moments: the big pep rally, the school dance, worrying about image, and, of course, falling in love. Though viewers shouldn't expect a highly accurate portrayal of life in the 1950s, the relationships among characters will feel like familiar emotional ground to many viewers. When it comes to an entertaining mix of singing, dancing, and comedy, GREASE -- which won a People's Choice Award -- is hard to beat. Parents will especially enjoy seeing John Travolta in his early days (boy, can he dance!).

Is it any good?

Grease was the word when this movie came out in 1978, and the word is still alive and well today, as evidenced by the movie's ever-growing legion of fans. In fact, it's the most profitable movie musical of all time, whose biggest hit, "Summer Nights," remains a standard at weddings, karaoke parties, and dances. Although the story is somewhat weak, the music and contagious energy more than make up for it, as do stellar performances by John Travolta, Olivia Newton-John, Stockard Channing, and Jeff Conaway.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about why this movie is still so popular. What makes it a classic?

  • Do the movie's themes still resonate today, or do they feel dated?

  • If you could update or remake this movie, how would you do it?

Movie details

Themes & Topics

Browse titles with similar subject matter.

For kids who love musicals

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