Home

Movie review by
Barbara Shulgas..., Common Sense Media
Home Movie Poster Image
Animated alien comedy is sweet, cute, if not super original.
  • PG
  • 2015
  • 94 minutes
Parents recommendPopular with kids

Parents say

age 5+
Based on 33 reviews

Kids say

age 6+
Based on 45 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Educational Value

Intended to entertain, rather than educate, but there are some lessons about the power of friendship and tolerance.

Positive Messages

Themes of tolerance, the power of friendship, and being who you really are. The Boov (and all viewers with pessimistic leanings) are encouraged to embrace humans' irrational but endearing tendencies toward hope and perseverance. Boovs give up when the odds are against them, but Tip never gives up on finding her mother.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Oh feels like an outsider among his people because, like humans, he wants friends and social interaction (in general, the Boov prefer to be alone). Despite their differences, he befriends Tip, and they teach each other the strengths of their people. Some toilet/potty humor (Oh likes to share information about his output).

Violence & Scariness

Gargantuan alien spaceships invade Earth. A main character appears to be killed but survives. Tip has lost/been separated from her mother.

Sexy Stuff
Language
Consumerism

Many licensing/merchandising tie-ins off screen, including books, clothing, and more.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Home is based on Adam Rex's children's book The True Meaning of Smekday. This skillfully animated movie creates a believable world in which aliens known as The Boov, running from their enemies, must find a new planet to inhabit ... so they take over Earth. Human families get broken up in the forced relocations that follow, and Tip (voiced by Rihanna) is separated from her mother -- which could be upsetting for small children. She teams up with Oh (Jim Parsons), the most human-friendly of The Boov, and an adventure ensues. The invaders and their large ships could be a little scary, and at one point it looks as though a main character dies (though that's not the case). There's also a little bit of toilet humor, but not much in the way of strong language, inappropriately sexy stuff, or substance use.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Parent Written byMommyLogic March 28, 2015

Cute but Serious..

My kids couldnt wait to see home and we saw it opening weekend. The cute one liners and looney tunes type humor kept my husband and I entertained. Of course the... Continue reading
Adult Written bymominNJ222 April 14, 2015

If your child is very sensitive...

Just a heads up that my 9 1/2 year old broke down in the middle at the thought of the mom missing. I kept trying to tell her that of course the mom would be fou... Continue reading
Teen, 13 years old Written byrappingballer September 5, 2015

you're too sensitive people

well my 2 and 4 year old cousins love the movie and they repeat the lines and sing the songs. they love it. and why would even be looking this movie up I mean c... Continue reading
Teen, 15 years old Written byjasgreg12 March 29, 2015

Amazing Film!!!

I was very excited to see this and I got what I expected and more. People of all ages will love it!

What's the story?

The Boov have a problem. Every time their archenemies, The Gorg, find them hiding somewhere new in the universe, The Boov have to run away to a new host planet. And this time, their destination is Earth. The humans -- including seventh grader Tip (voiced by Rihanna), who ends up separated from her mother, are less than thrilled as The Boov vacuum them up and send them to Australia. But Tip makes an unlikely friend in Oh (Jim Parsons), an unusually friendly Boov who craves a connection. Despite a rocky start, the two form a bond, and together they conspire to find Tip’s mother and -- naturally -- save the planet.

Is it any good?

Plenty of creativity and artistry were lavished on HOME's production, and the animation is flat-out beautiful. The movie is good, if not startlingly original -- which may be just fine for most young moviegoers. The Boov look a little like the pudgy, adorable Minions from the Despicable Me franchise, with some mini-Shrek thrown in. And The Boov's clueless leader, Captain Smek (an enthusiastic Steve Martin), recalls Madagascar's hilariously egomaniacal but not particularly brave King Julien. (When threatened, the Boov legend goes, "Smek wisely fled in terror.")

The Boov frown upon courage and lack the human yearning for company; they find human behavior totally bewildering. This makes the lovable Oh an outlier -- he's a guy who wants to party down living among a people who believe that "Parties are useless and take up valuable Boov time."  ("Among The Boov, I do not fit in," he explains. "I fit out.") The relationship between the good-hearted but friendless alien and the skeptical, self-reliant Tip is beautifully rendered. And the songs (sung by Rihanna) that dot the action help enormously to clarify the movie's emotional underpinnings. The decision to emphasize humanity's best characteristics -- the tendency to display irrational hope in the face of long odds -- makes Home a feel-good experience even as aliens are taking over the planet.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about Home's messages about tolerance. How does the movie demonstrate that it's OK to be friends with people who look different from you and live differently from you?

  • Why do you think some people might give up hope before they even try? Why is failing so scary?

  • How would you feel if every time you lied, you turned green? Do humans have other "tells" when they lie?

  • If you've read the book the movie is based on, how do they compare? Which do you like better, and why?

Movie details

Themes & Topics

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