Igor

Movie review by
Sandie Angulo Chen, Common Sense Media
Igor Movie Poster Image
Mad-scientist comedy with dark humor, cartoon violence.
  • PG
  • 2008
  • 93 minutes

Parents say

age 10+
Based on 19 reviews

Kids say

age 7+
Based on 13 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Educational Value

Meant to entertain rather than educate.

Positive Messages

The movie's message is that just because people think you're a monster doesn't mean you to have meet their low expectations -- and that we can all choose to rise above and be good.

Positive Role Models & Representations

No positive role models. 

Violence & Scariness

Monsters wreak havoc, mostly against other monsters. The rest of the world is threatened by a yearly onslaught of monsters. An immortal suicidal rabbit seriously injures himself, knowing he can't die. An evil scientist is crushed, and another one dies in an explosion. Dark humor, such as the poster of a cat hanging by a noose with the caption, "Hang in there, baby." Lead character attacks antagonist with a knife. 

Sexy Stuff

A buxom woman flirts with evil scientists; two characters fall in love. Sexual innuendo; for instance, male character asks a female character, "You've seen a lot of brains, right? Is mine bigger than average?" Characters dance the tango, female dancers expose thighs touched by male dancers. 

Language

Mild insults: "idiot," "stupid," "failure." 

Consumerism

References to Inside the Actors Studio and Annie.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Cocktail and champagne drinking. 

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Igor is a 2008 animated dark comedy in which the title character no longer wants to be a lab assistant and wants to win the science fair. Expect dark humor, such as a suicidal bunny who can't die, and a poster of a cat hanging by a noose with the caption, "Hang in there, baby." Cartoonish violence, such as explosions and characters heads and bodies blown and shot up in ways reminiscent of older Warner Bros. cartoons. Slapstick violence throughout. Some sexual content, such as one of the male characters asking a female character, "You've seen a lot of brains, right? Is mine bigger than average?" and women with exaggerated large breasts. Cocktail and champagne drinking. Overall, the movie is a failed attempt at Tim Burton-style animation and dark humor. 

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User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written byTinyToya October 12, 2011

Big Turn Off

I tried watching this movie on Disney channel and let me tell you I was shocked. There is a character whose breasts look like two pointy cones (traffic ones) on... Continue reading
Adult Written bychrissielove June 16, 2009
This was a horrible movie for little ones! Even my husband and I were turned off by the sexual scenes and violence, especially at the end of the movie. There wa... Continue reading
Kid, 8 years old January 23, 2009

Suprised by Common Sense Review

We turned this movie off about half way through and had a talk about what we'd seen so far with our sever year-old son. After the talk, we decided not to w... Continue reading
Teen, 14 years old Written byYesitsalex October 31, 2014

The thing is...

Can frighten young children and igor says the god word which may offend those who are sensitive religiously

What's the story?

In the dark, gloomy kingdom of Malaria, evil scientists have free rein to create monstrous inventions with the help of hunchbacked servants who are all called Igor. The central Igor (voiced by John Cusack) secretly wants to be a scientist, so when his misguided master (John Cleese) dies in a lab explosion, Igor brings to life a towering female monster, Eva (Molly Shannon). But instead of being vicious, she's convinced -- thanks to a brain-washing mix up -- that she's an aspiring actress.

Is it any good?

IGOR borrows its animation style from Tim Burton and its story from Young Frankenstein, but even with such classic inspiration, it's only OK. At least the voice actors are top-notch -- the supporting cast includes Steve Buscemi as the voice of Igor's suicidal-but-invincible rabbit creation Scamper; Sean Hayes as Brain, a dim-witted brain in a jar; and Eddie Izzard as the hilariously named celebrity scientist Dr. Schadenfreude.

Kids will certainly be entertained, especially by the antics of the two sidekicks responsible for most of the laughs. The story is so simple that even very young kids will be able to follow along, and Eva is surprisingly touching as she practices "Tomorrow" and dresses up like Gloria Swanson. Igor -- like many other recent animated movies -- may fall short of the Pixar standard for greatness, but it's good enough for most little monsters who can handle the dark humor.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the movie's messages. Why is it so out of the ordinary for Igor to want to be a scientist? How do others' expectations affect the way we behave and the way we see ourselves? 

  • How does the movie use dark humor for the sake of comedy? What do you think is the appeal of dark humor? Is dark humor appropriate for young kids? 

  • How was the violence reminiscent of the cartoons of the past? Are cartoons such as these a bad influence on kids, or do you think kids can see the exaggeration and know that it isn't real and can't happen in real life? 

  • Families can also discuss how this film fits into the monster-movie genre. What does it have in common with movies about Frankenstein and the hunchback of Notre Dame? How is it different? Kids: If you could create a "monster," what would it be like?

Movie details

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Themes & Topics

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