Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children

Movie review by
S. Jhoanna Robledo, Common Sense Media
Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children Movie Poster Image
Creepy but exciting Burton fantasy based on best-seller.
  • PG-13
  • 2016
  • 127 minutes
Popular with kids

Parents say

age 12+
Based on 52 reviews

Kids say

age 11+
Based on 107 reviews

We think this movie stands out for:

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Positive Messages

Being different doesn't make you a misfit -- just unique and gifted in your own way. Also, relationships between young people and their elderly relatives can be beautiful and character shaping. Themes include courage, curiosity, and integrity.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Jake is loyal to his grandfather and has a heart big enough -- and a mind open enough -- to be able to believe in things he can't quite explain. His grandfather is caring and conscientious and fosters curiosity and imagination in his grandson. Characters are brave and demonstrate integrity.

Violence

Very creepy tone throughout; many scenes have a sense of menace and foreboding. Opening sequence is quite scary, with a deadly attack and a boy fleeing through the woods. The main character loses a family member. The battle scenes between the Peculiars and the Hollows (who subsist on eating Peculiars and other beings) are pretty brutal, if light on blood. They use explosives, arrows, and anything lying around to fight each other. In one scene, characters eat eyeballs. A dead, bloodied man is shown lying on the ground, seemingly having been attacked by an otherworldly being. Talk of a dead child, his body lying in a room; like others who die in the movie, his eyes are hollowed out. One scene briefly suggests that a Peculiar may have been killed.

Sex

Romance between two of the Peculiars. Flirting and hand-holding.

Language

Infrequent use of swearing, including "crap," "goddamn," "hell," and "bollocks."

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Adults drink in a pub. 

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that director Tim Burton's Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children is based on the first book in Ransom Riggs' spine-tingling, best-selling gothic trilogy. It definitely shares some of the book's complex content and themes, including death and the yearning to belong. That, plus the movie's overwhelming feeling of creepiness, make it too intense for younger kids. There are also battle scenes with weapons (explosives, arrows, and more), mayhem, and death. It's not especially gory, but the tone is pretty dark. There's talk of a dead child, and a key character is shown on the ground, bloodied and dead. The main character loses a family member. The evil characters are very menacing: They eat other creatures to survive, and characters are shown eating eyeballs. But running underneath the creepy stuff is the message that being different doesn't make you a misfit -- just unique and gifted in your own way. And characters demonstrate courage, curiosity, and integrity.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Parent Written bysallyj1 October 7, 2016

Very, very scary

I took my 11 year old daughter (she loves watching marvel films, hunger games, divergent which are 12 rating) and her cousin who is 12 to see this film. We wal... Continue reading
Parent Written byVictoria N. October 5, 2016

Very intense for little kids.

We went to this movie as a family based on the fun previews. We expected the "hollows" as well as some scary content but we actually had to leave the... Continue reading
Teen, 14 years old Written byBuffy Rules September 30, 2016
Teen, 14 years old Written byPoppy.bath September 30, 2016

good but not for the faint hearted!!

saw this movie last night and had my eyes shut for around 15 minutes! it was incredibly creepy throughout but by far the most freaky was the part with the dead... Continue reading

What's the story?

Directed by Tim Burton, MISS PEREGRINE'S HOME FOR PECULIAR CHILDREN follows teenage Jake's (Asa Butterfield) quest to find the titular Miss Peregrine (Eva Green) on a mysterious Welsh island soon after (possible spoiler alert!) his grandfather's (Terence Stamp) terrible death. When Jake and his father manage to find a way to get to Wales, Jake sets out immediately to find what his grandfather described as Peculiars -- children who have special powers that may not translate well into the real world.

Is it any good?

Though it starts out unevenly, this fantasy soon finds its footing, taking viewers on a fascinating ride. Director Tim Burton doesn't pull any punches on the creep factor in Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children. He layers the visual storytelling with darkness and sadness. Those who aren't familiar with the Ransom Riggs book the movie is based on may not be aware of the ways the film is different, but Burton's version still has plenty for the book's fans to applaud.

One of the gifts of a director like Burton is that he has the vision and imagination needed to create a world that only existed in writing before. In Miss Peregrine, Burton flexes his considerable muscles by building that world and plunging audiences right into the heart of it. As Jake, Butterfield does a great job portraying the earnestness, bravado, and confusion of a teenage boy. And the rest of the cast is also pretty strong, especially Samuel L. Jackson.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the violence and scariness in Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children. How do they compare to what you might see in a more traditional action/superhero movie? Which has more of an impact on you? Why?

  • How do the characters demonstrate courage, curiosity, and integrity? Why are those important character strengths?

  • Parents don't come off very well in this film; they seem self-absorbed and unaware of their children's true plight. Why is that? How does it affect Jake?

  • Does the Peculiars' existence feel sad or revolutionary to you? Why does Jake feel the need to look for them? How does finding them impact him?

  • If you've read the book, how does the movie compare? Which do you like better, and why?

Movie details

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