The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn, Part 2

Movie review by
Sandie Angulo Chen, Common Sense Media
The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn, Part 2 Movie Poster Image
Final Twilight focuses on Edward and Bella's legacy.
  • PG-13
  • 2012
  • 115 minutes
Popular with kidsParents recommend

Parents say

age 15+
Based on 19 reviews

Kids say

age 13+
Based on 65 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Positive Messages

The final installment in the Twilight series is about fulfilling your personal destiny, as Bella realizes that she was "born" to become a vampire. The importance of family and friendship is pivotal, as Bella decides to keep her father in her life, and the Cullens summon their vampire friends from around the globe to stand with them against the wrath of the Volturi. 

Positive Role Models & Representations

Bella finally comes into her own and no longer relies on the Cullens to defend her. Her special defensive skills allow her to shield herself and those she loves from other vampires' offensive tactics. The Cullens are once again exceptionally generous and kind. Charlie Swan is a patient, understanding father who's willing to accept Bella as she is, even though he knows something is really odd about her. Parenthood changes Bella and Edward, who finally have someone other than each other to focus on and protect. Jacob is loyal to a fault.

Violence

(Note: Potential spoilers ahead.). For most of the movie, the threat of violence looms, so the vampires practice their combat/defense abilities before facing the Volturi. In a flashback, a bloody-faced "immortal child" and his maker, a vampire "mother," are killed and burned. During the climactic battle scene, various characters (major and minor) are injured, beheaded, burned, and otherwise hurt -- and even killed (some of the deaths are likely to be shocking). One vampire can telepathically torture people, another immobilizes their senses, and other vampires show off their abilities in battle.

Sex

Now that they're married, Edward and Bella have sex in a rather prolonged, sensuous sequence that tends to focus on close-ups of their faces and flashes of skin -- but no graphic nudity. In the final shot of the love scene, there's a glimpse of them standing in profile, and viewers can see their bare backs and the side of Bella's breast. Various passionate kisses both between Edward and Bella and other couples in the movie.

Language

Language includes "ass," "damn," "hell," "bloodsucker," "crap," "idiot," "stupid," etc.

Consumerism

Bella drives a Volvo, but otherwise there are fewer obvious product placements than in some of the other Twilight movies. Off-camera, there's loads of Twilight-branded merchandise, including apparel, posters, games, calendars, jewelry, toys, and accessories.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that the final installment in the Twilight saga is a must-see movie for any fans (teen or otherwise) who've followed the series' page-to-screen adaptations -- as well as stars Robert Pattinson and Kristen Stewart's public relationship. The movie is fairly faithful to the second half of the Breaking Dawn book, except that it amplifies the violent nature of the book's climactic battle between the Cullens and the Volturi. Several characters are tortured, violently beheaded, burned, ripped apart by werewolves, etc., and there are some shocking deaths (though, overall, not much gore). There's one long, sensuous love scene (with close-ups of bare skin and faces and a glimpse of the side of Bella's breast, but nothing more graphic than that), as well as several passionate kisses between various couples. Language is minimal, as in all of the movies in the series.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written bythemerrykitchen November 16, 2012

too much for this loving mother to handle

Spoiler alert! I have not read the books, so was completely unprepared for the topic of vampire children that showed up in a heart-wrenching manner in the movie... Continue reading
Adult Written byflower2011 November 16, 2012

This is NOT a Children's Movie!!! But it was epic!!!

For ages 13 and up. Overall, the only language that was found throughout the movie were the h-word, a-word, and d-word, all three being used maybe a total of th... Continue reading
Kid, 12 years old November 16, 2012

BEST. MOVIE. EVER!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

This movie is not a disappointment. It is the second best movie i have seen. Ever (Titanic is the first). I went to the 10:00 showing with my friend and I was e... Continue reading
Teen, 17 years old Written byAngela Delia May 15, 2013

What's the story?

THE TWILIGHT SAGA: BREAKING DAWN, PART 2 picks up where Part 1 left off: Bella (Kristen Stewart) waking up as a vampire, with her husband Edward (Robert Pattinson) and their hybrid vampire-human daughter, Renesmee (Mackenzie Foy), waiting for her. Much to Bella's chagrin, her werewolf best friend, Jacob (Taylor Lautner), explains that he's imprinted on Renesmee, who grows at an extremely rapid rate. For a while, things in the Cullen household are idyllic ... until another vampire sees Renesmee, mistakes her for a vampire child (who are forbidden to create), and informs the Volturi. Alice (Ashley Greene) has a vision of the Volturi coming to kill the Cullens, so the family enlists help from vampires around the world to stand with them against the tyranny of Aro (Michael Sheen) and his minions.

Is it any good?

Director Bill Condon has once again captured the essence of the final Twilight book, with a few twists thrown into the mix that intensify the story's thrills and chills. Ultimately, this is a tale of Bella and Edward's need to protect their daughter and family from the bloody threat of annihilation. It's exciting to meet a host of vampires beyond the Cullen crew and to see how easily Jacob settles into the role of Renesmee's protector instead of Bella's pouty lovestruck friend. Foy, who looks startlingly like her onscreen parents, does a good job of being so sweet and adorable that of course dozens of vampires would flock to defend her.

Sadly, some of the most charming supporting characters have little to do in the final Twilight, like the wolf pack and even the Cullen sisters Rosalie and Alice. But the addition of all the extra vampires, most notably Lee Pace as a Revolutionary War friend of Jasper's, Rami Malek as an Egyptian vampire, and Case LaBow as one of the Denali tribe, almost makes up for the lack of the Quileute tribe. Fans of the book will be startled by the changes to one particular sequence in the story, but if they stay patient, they'll find that, as in the novel, Bella and Edward get their perfect piece of forever after all. (Be sure to watch during the credits for the chance get one more look at all of your favorite characters from the entire saga.)

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the Twilight series' impact on pop culture. Do you think the messages of the books and movies are positive? How has the off-screen relationship between Robert Pattinson and Kristen Stewart affected your thoughts about the movies?

  • How does Bella's transformation into a vampire change her? Is she more likable as a vampire? How do her abilities as a vampire affect those around her?

  • Is Bella and Edward's romance a positive example for teenagers? What's your take on the mature issues of marriage and parenthood addressed in the movie? Parents, take this opportunity to talk to your children about your own family's values when it comes to these topics.

  • There's one part of the movie that diverges from the book; did the twists upset you, or do you understand why they made the changes?

Movie details

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