Crashing

TV review by
Melissa Camacho, Common Sense Media
Crashing TV Poster Image
Fun, edgy British comedy about unique community of friends.

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

Friendship, relationships, communal living are all themes addressed. 

Positive Role Models & Representations

Cast members range from being self-centered and narcissistic to just dysfunctional.

Violence

Yelling, arguments, occasional pushing, shoving, slapping. An attempted suicide is suspected. 

Sex

Lots of crude talk. Partial nudity. 

Language

Frequent cursing includes "s--t," "f--k."

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Lots of drinking (wine, beer, hard liquor, etc.). References to drugs. 

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Crashing is an edgy British comedy about a group of millennials living communally in an abandoned hospital. Its themes are mature, including relationships and sexuality. Arguing is common, there's some occasional shoves and slaps, and in one instance a suicide attempt is suspected. There's lots of drinking, too. The series highlights things like friendship and being a community, but they're sometimes overshadowed by characters' dysfunctional behavior.  

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What's the story?

Written by Fleabag's Phoebe Waller-Bridge, CRASHING is a British comedy about a group of millennials living communally in an abandoned hospital. It stars Waller-Bridge as Lulu, who moves to London and joins her childhood friend Anthony (Damien Molony), his straight-laced fiancé Kate (Louise Ford), and other members of the rag-tag community who are serving as property guardians of the old hospital building in exchange for low rent. There's never a dull moment, thanks to residents like narcissistic and flamboyant Sam (Jonathan Bailey), moody French artist Melody (Julie Dray), and the rather square Fred (Amit Shah). Completing the community is Colin (Adrian Scarborough), who's trying to get through his divorce. It's an odd place to live, with lots of rules to follow, but together they find ways to make it feel like home. 

Is it any good?

This well-written series contains all the wit and edgy humor that Phoebe Waller-Bridge's work is known for. Driving the show is the colorful and flawed cast of characters, each member of which is trying to thrive in living arrangements that are one step up from squatting. The result is a quirky combination of over-the-top situations and funny moments. 

The show's romance-themed narratives aren't particularly original. But Crashing is smart and sharp, and its focus on property guardianship, which is a growing trend in many urban areas, gives it some freshness. Granted, it's not for everyone, but if you appreciate good biting English humor set against a contemporary backdrop, it's worth tuning in to. 

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about friendship. What do the characters in Crashing have in common? Would you want to live with your friends? Why or why not?

  • Crashing contains lots of innuendo, cursing, and drinking. Is it possible to tell this story and keep it funny without including edgy content? What does it add to the show?

TV details

For kids who love British TV

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