Squidbillies

TV review by
Emily Ashby, Common Sense Media
Squidbillies TV Poster Image
Irreverent cartoon mocks the rural South. Skip it.

Parents say

age 16+
Based on 16 reviews

Kids say

age 15+
Based on 43 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

The show takes stereotyping to the extreme, greatly exaggerating what's often associated with rural southern life. The main characters are violent toward friends and family members. Attitudes toward and portrayals of women are extremely derogatory.

Violence

Characters shoot, stab, and maim others. One body is mutilated with a chainsaw, another character is mauled repeatedly by wolves, and some relationships (including the main one between a father and a son) are physically and emotionally abusive. The local businessman markets various products for infanticide.

Sex

Cartoon figures simulate sex, and innuendoes are common. Clothing often bears suggestive language and/or graphics.

Language

Curse words like "damn," "hell," and "bitch" and body-part words like "ass" and "boobs" are common. Characters often refer to others in racially prejudiced terms like "cracker."

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Smoking and drinking is commonplace throughout the show. Drug use is alluded to from time to time.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this mature cartoon (part of the Adult Swim line-up on Cartoon Network) is so riddled with violence, sexual references, and disturbing dialogue that it's easy to miss what little inane plot actually exists. Human characters often meet untimely demises, from being constricted by a snake man to the point of decapitation to being burned by an intentionally combustible baby's soothing toy. The main characters are inbred squid who are appallingly stereotyped as hillbilly inhabitants of the southern United States. This show is completely inappropriate for kids.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Parent of a 15 and 17 year old Written byladyblue January 20, 2011

this show is simply hilarious

this cartoon is a crack-up. just watch it. whether its for children or not is just ridiculous! it probably mirrors whatever is already in their homes! it is cl... Continue reading
Adult Written byPatrick G. March 16, 2018

The reason parents should talk to their children about the CONTEXT of programming, not just content.

Any one who has watched the show will affirm this: this is inappropriate for young children and teens. However, this is only shown on AdultSwims late night bloc... Continue reading
Teen, 13 years old Written bySeto007 October 17, 2009
As a lover of Random and Dark humor, there is very little I won't watch on Adult Swim: THis is probably the only one I won't watch. No, not because i... Continue reading
Teen, 13 years old Written byTheProdigy November 18, 2015

Good MATURE TEENS ONLY!!!

funny show! But lots of language (F*** is bleeped out, so is S***), moderate sexual references, the grandma does meth and smokes ciggaretes. The dad drinks. So,... Continue reading

What's the story?

The animated comedy SQUIDBILLIES is part of Cartoon Network's Adult Swim lineup and tells the tale of a squid named Early Cuyler (voiced by Danny "Unknown Hinson" Baker) and his family, who all live in rural northern Georgia. Early is the product of inbreeding, extreme poverty, and illiteracy; he's unemployed and engaged to a morbidly obese human woman who is forever demanding various tokens of his love, so he holds up a store at gunpoint to satisfy her needs. He's quickly convicted of armed robbery (since the sheriff was behind him in line at the store he robbed) and sent to the slammer for a 15-year stay. Meanwhile, Early's girlfriend bears his illegitimate half-human, half-squid child and dumps him on the doorstep of Early's sister, Lil (Patricia French). After serving his time, Early is reunited with teenage Rusty (Daniel McDevitt), the son he didn't know he had. To satisfy his parole requirements, Early lands a job with local corrupt businessman Dan Halen (Todd Hanson), who markets life-threatening infant products and dabbles in espionage.

Is it any good?

Squidbillies is little more than 15 minutes of heaped-up negative messages. Beatings, shootings, and stabbings are routine solutions to problems, and Early and Rusty's relationship is marred by physical and emotional abuse -- which, incredibly, Rusty almost welcomes, since he's so desperate for a role model in his life.

Simulated sex is common, and sexual references are both spoken and spelled out on Early's myriad of message-touting hats, one of which features the words "Booty Hunter" surrounding a silhouette of a shapely woman on her hands and knees.

Racial and otherwise derogatory slurs are harsh and unfettered. Early is especially vicious toward women and white people, for whom he harbors great hatred. Rampant prejudice coupled with issues like illiteracy, incest, and poverty are tied to the show's stereotyped "white trash" characters. While adults may be able to put the show's humor into context, its crassness makes it completely inappropriate for kids.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the dangers of prejudice and stereotyping. Why are stereotypes so often played for laughs on TV and in other media? What groups of people are most commonly picked on? How are they portrayed? In what ways are the portrayals exaggerated? How might it feel to be part of a group that's often the butt of jokes?

TV details

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