Tiny Creatures

TV review by
Melissa Camacho, Common Sense Media
Tiny Creatures TV Poster Image
Fun small animal stories feature harrowing moments.

Parents say

age 4+
Based on 3 reviews

Kids say

No reviews yetAdd your rating

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

It offers some interesting details about little animals and insects, but it is mostly dedicated to telling a a good story that features animals as characters. 

Positive Role Models & Representations

The animals do what they have to do to survive.

Violence & Scariness

Animals are shown being hunted and chased by predators like rattlesnakes, birds, and other species. 

Sexy Stuff
Language
Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Tiny Creatures is an animal-themed documentary series that follows small animals and insects in various habitats around the country, and tells their stories with drama and flair. Animal lovers of all ages will enjoy learning more about the smaller species of critters, but younger or more sensitive viewers may find some of the predatory scenes a little scary. 

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User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written byBreadhart August 30, 2020

Educate yourself on proper animal care!

This show is well made and filmed, turning the lives of small animals into dramatic stories. We had high hopes as the kids and I love nature documentaries. This... Continue reading
Adult Written byDeasanni August 17, 2020

Love

I LOVE this show! I hope they continue it!

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

What's the story?

Narrated by Mike Colter, TINY CREATURES is a docudrama about little animals across the United States experiencing new things and facing scary moments as they explore the world around them. From an escaped golden hamster seeking adventure in New York City to a rescued duckling trying to survive the wilds of her young owner's bedroom, each episode features a small creature that ventures out into a world beyond its own. As they see and experience new things, they must also do everything they can to avoid their natural enemies, and hopefully find some friends along the way. 

Is it any good?

Each episode of this fun, but dramatic, docuseries offers a scripted, and sometimes anthropomorphizing, story about small animals' heroic adventures out in the wild. Each tale contains some lighthearted moments, but watching the animals' efforts to escape predators (and sometimes harmful humans) can be nerve-wracking thanks to the dramatic voice-over and use of slow-motion video. Nonetheless, there are lots of lovely and interesting images here, and Tiny Creatures will amuse those looking for more entertaining animal stories. 

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the way Tiny Creatures tells each animal's story. Does the narration make it more interesting? Scary? Are the events that transpire as dramatic as the narrator makes them out to be?

  • Imagine that you are a tiny creature. What would it be like to live in such a big world? Would it be as adventurous or treacherous as it seems in this series? 

TV details

Our editors recommend

For kids who love nature

Themes & Topics

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