TeenSpot

Website review by
Karen Wirsing, Common Sense Media
TeenSpot Website Poster Image
Less pop culture, more sexy stuff in chatrooms and profiles.

Parents say

age 16+
Based on 8 reviews

Kids say

age 18+
Based on 3 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this website.

Positive Messages

If used constructively, the site offers teens information about health and style.

Violence

Violent war games can be played in the games section. 

Sex

Explicit sexual conversation takes place in chat rooms and on profile pages. In the "singles" chat room boys advertise that they are in search of girls with "huge boobs" and "big asses." They make no qualms about their desire to speak with "hot/sexy" women and ask girls how sexually experienced they are. Men also ask women to chat privately.

Language

The chat rooms are full of sexual epithets and words such as "tits" and "ass." 

Consumerism

This is an entertainment site that informs teens about the most popular games, movies, music, and television shows. Along with their own personal media rating system, the site is chock-full of marketing advertisements encouraging teens to buy the latest fashion trends.  

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Profile pages display teens chatting about drinking alcohol and smoking marijuana.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that even though TeenSpot is advertised for teens; it's in fact not for kids at all. The website includes a wide variety of entertainment information; from popular games and movies to celebrity gossip and fashion. Users are encouraged to create profile accounts and engage in the "Meet People" section. Similar to "Myspace," this section of the site allows teens to "friend" one another and to post comments on each other's pages. Accounts are created by choosing a nickname, sexual preference, age, and by uploading a photo. Many users choose names such as "hotwildsex" "kissylips" and "sweet-temptation." Users are supposed to be over 13 and younger than 23 to register, however it is not difficult to create an account without showing proof of age. Once a profile is created people are free to search for other singles and engage in chat rooms. The chat rooms and profile pages are occupied by flirting teens propositioning one another. Profiles are also rated by other users for "most popular" person and "hottest" guy and girl. 

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Parent of a 2 and 2 year old Written byXBrookieBabiX October 15, 2011

Stupid

I made a profile on Teenspot when I was 14 and it was really gross. I got messages from ugly, 40 year old creepy men (and women) that were sexually explicit and... Continue reading
Parent of a 5, 6, 7, 10, 10, and 17 year old Written byCharlie The Cat December 22, 2011
Teen, 14 years old Written byboxxy989 July 29, 2011

dont go on here

this site is filled with pedophiles and trolls do not let anyone on here
Teen, 15 years old Written byALyssa5492 November 7, 2012

Don't Let Your Teen Near This Site! (Coming from a Teen!)

Hey I am 15 years old and I have always wanted a boyfriend. I heard about TeenSpot and made and account because its apparently "a dating website". Uhm... Continue reading

Is it any good?

Rather than focusing on informative media coverage, TeenSpot has become an online dating space for teens. If monitored and used appropriately it covers an array of information about pop culture; unfortunately, social networking overrides what could have been. Users are more interested in flirting and sending sexy messages than discussing the best games and top movie choices of the week. The primary focus and interest on the site are which users are "hot or not," along with which users are the "most popular." Topics such as this can lead to emotional and psychological destruction and opens the door for cyberbullying. TeenSpot is a good idea in essence, but fails to provide a safe and positive place where teens can express themselves. 

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the importance of Internet safety. What are the risks of chatting with someone that you don't know online?

  • Families can also talk about cyberbullying. What is the best way to approach someone who is doing the bullying?

  • How does it feel to be rated on your looks? Discuss the problem with this sort of online activity. Why are some teens drawn to this type of interaction?

Website details

For kids who love games and movies

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